Julie Devallière, Ph.D.


Immunobiology and Biomedical Engineering

Research history

The lack of a sufficient blood vessel system represents the main limitation in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. I work on new methods to promote the formation of vascular network in 3D tissue mimic. In this approach, endothelial cells are transplanted within 3D gel and self-assemble into vessel-like structures in response to growth factors. I test the hypothesis that delivery of specific miRNA or antagomirs, which are regulator of angiogenic process, can further enhance vascular assembly. I use nanoparticles to deliver miRNA to their intracellular targets and test their action in a 3D gel in vitro and in vivo.

Research Interests:

My first research work was carried out in the Sanofi-aventis healthcare group (Toulouse, France) during my professional training as engineer. The research subject was focused on tumor angiogenesis and the validation of therapeutic targets for human cancer. I joined INSERM research unit 643 (Nantes, France) specialized in transplant immunology in 2007 to achieve a Master in Cellular Biology in Dr Béatrice Charreau group. I completed my formation with Ph.D. thesis with financial support of European funding program named Xenome whose aim is to generate the necessary data to allow xenotransplantation to progress towards an initial clinical trial. During three years, I worked on a scientific project designed to explore the role of the signaling adaptor molecule Lnk (SH2B3) in endothelial cell dysfunction associated with transplant rejection. This study demonstrated that modulation of Lnk may be a promising strategy to prevent endothelial cell activation and apoptosis and potentially transplant rejection (Xenotransplantation, 2011). Moreover, I described a new role for Lnk protein as a regulator of the beta1 integrin pathway, influencing adhesion and migration of endothelial cells (FASEB J., under review).

Research History:

<p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The lack of a sufficient blood vessel system represents the main limitation in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. I work on new methods to promote the formation of vascular network in 3D tissue mimic. In this approach, endothelial cells are transplanted within 3D gel and self-assemble into vessel-like structures in response to growth factors. I test the hypothesis that delivery of specific miRNA or antagomirs, which are regulator of angiogenic process, can further enhance vascular assembly. I use nanoparticles to deliver miRNA to their intracellular targets and test their action in a 3D gel in vitro and in vivo.</p>